• Jacqueline Gum

    Ok…I am SURE that I am not the only laughing at this! Hilarious even as it teaches a valuable lesson about learning the hard way. I sure enjoyed the read, even as I cringed a little that they kept making you get on another …darn pony!!!

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Jacquie, Well if I made YOU laugh, then it’s served its purpose. Working for Susan, I read your blog regularly and you always crack me up! Glad you liked my pony story. 🙂

  • Cheryl Therrien

    Laughing, sympathy, and all the rest come in to mind in reading this story. I had some similar experiences, however mine led me to only like horses from afar. Thanks for sharing Kristi. 🙂

    • Kristi Morgan

      Happy Monday, Cheryl! Glad you enjoyed my story. It’s too bad your experiences led you to only like horses from a distance. My sisters in law and niece are all still back in South Dakota and big into barrel racing year round. Even though we all went through this same experience, we learned to love horses. I just got away from it when I moved to California and sure miss it.

  • Eve Koivula

    As we got to the lesson learned (yes, I was laughing, also because I’ve been there and done that, too with Shetland ponies…), I remembered learning how to drive a car: First taking the mandatory classes with one that didn’t require me doing much anything behind the wheel, and then moving on to driving my parent’s old vehicle with kind of a will of it’s own. For the obvious reasons, I became a great driver for which I’m forever grateful. 🙂

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Eve – Yep I got many replies on Facebook with OMG my Shetland pony’s name was Spitfire and mine was name Poker, etc. It seems anyone who grew up on a ranch in the Midwest somewhere can relate. And learning to drive back on the farm usually meant a really super old stick shift truck when you were about 8…but that’s a whole other story. Glad you enjoyed it! 🙂

  • Lovely story and a good lesson about the bumps in life. I’ve been on a horse exactly twice in my life. The first time I went with friends and I was given a five-minute lesson (ha) and then the owner of the stable slapped the horse on the rump and off we went — for a while. Then the horse knew he had an amateur on his back and stopped dead in his tracks. I couldn’t move him. At the end of the hour the owner came racing towards me to say I was overtime — sure I was. How the heck was I expected to get this horse going when all he wanted to do was eat the flowers.

    My next ride was on vacation in New England. The horse saw the barn and headed straight for it with me on his back about to get my head clipped off when the owner pulled up. I climbed off the horse — and all horses — forever!

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Jeannette – I am so glad you enjoyed my story. Your reply reminds me of the trail rides we used to go on in the Black Hills when we were really little. My parents would pay a bunch of money, the horses were very tame, but boy when they wanted to stop and eat some grass or flowers there was no way you were going to yank their head back up and get them going again. Finally the trail guide, would have to just take my horse by the reins and lead him along to keep his head up and keep him going. Horses do have a mind of their own!

  • Great story, and yes determination and learning not to quit are good lessons to learn, though it does seem a little harsh for a toddler. Had no idea Shetlands were so mean. They are adorable to look at though.

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi A.K.. Thanks for checking out my story. I’m glad you enjoyed it. Yes, Shetland ponies are super cute, aren’t they? And they are so tiny – when you are an ADULT. But when you are a little kid they seem ginormous! And fast. My mother probably read the post today and thought oh you are so dramatic! It wasn’t that bad. And obviously it wasn’t. My brother, sisters-in-law, cousins, niece and I all went through the same experiences and look back now and laugh with fond memories. We learned a lot, developed a life long love of horses and there were only a few broken bones along the way. 🙂

  • maxwell ivey

    Hi Kristi; i got a lot of laughs out of your post. in my family it was bicycles and later go karts or dirt bikes. you are right they were teaching you the important lessons. in the carnival business when you have a bad week like when the rain comes or no people show up you can usually here the help saying things like what are we here for we don’t need any more practice. but as my dad used to say you have to play the blanks to be around for the big spots. and this was true and still is because no matter how well you are doing there are still going to be times when things don’t go as expected or hoped for. great story. glad you are here helping susan out. take care, max

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Max – Glad you got some laughs and could relate to the story. I think a lot of times our parents put us through these things and as kids we just don’t understand why. I know I could never understand why i couldn’t just have a real, normal, NICE horse to start with, instead of a mean pony. It is only when we get older that we can look back and realize our parents knew what they were doing and had a plan all along. Mine did and it sounds like yours did too and we are better for it. Have a great rest of your week! 🙂

  • Pat Ruppel

    Hi Kristi — good story of your Shetland ponies. I had heard that ponies could be temperamental and possibly mean when we were looking for our first horse. So, we got a yearling Morgan instead, mostly because it had always been hubby’s dream to have a horse.

    Never having horses or being around them, we sure had a lot to learn. Our young Morgan was intelligent but had a stubborn streak which fit right in with the personality of our oldest daughter. They sure had their go-arounds and the horse always won. Those were good times. I loved them. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

    • Kristi Morgan

      Our family all has plenty of wonderful memories that involved our horses too. They continue the tradition to this day. It was a lot of fun. I’m glad you enjoyed the story, Pat.

      • Pat Ruppel

        I did, Kristi. It’s nice to share those memories with you.

  • So fun to see you post here on Susan’s blog Kristi. I’d much rather have a Welsh pony than a Shetland, but as a kid, I wasn’t too choosy since I rode whatever anyone would let me, even when the two Shetlands in my life had a habit of biting me.

    • Kristi Morgan

      Thanks, Jeri. I almost emailed you with an editing question on it. I remember your post on riding any pony you could find. Once we were done with one pony and moved on to the next bigger one, we’d save the old ones for our city cousins to come out and ride. They, like you, were happy with any pony that could get their hands on and would ride them around in circles for hours on end. Ours were biters too. 🙂

  • maxwell ivey

    hi kristi; well at least my dad was honest about some of the things he put us through. he would say he was giving us a fine education and that we should thank him for not charging us anything for it. 🙂 he was funny that way. he also sometimes referred to it as keeping us young. thanks for the memory, max

  • Hi Kristi! This is such an adorable & insightful post. Even though Banjo had his trying moments, I would still love to learn about life through that irresistible face!! 😉

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Mary! I am so glad you liked my post. Yes, it is amazing how something so darn cute can be so mean. They were absolutely irresistible. I think that’s how we all ended up with them. As a fellow SoCal girl, I always enjoy reading your blog and seeing what you are up to and what I can check out next. Some of your fairly recent Pasadena outings sounded great and not too far from home. 🙂

  • Boy that was one heck of a learning experience. Growing up in San Francisco ponies were not in the cards. I do remember as a child riding a horse once and that was my first and last time. All I remember is that the horse threw me and I landed on my butt and the owners of the horse gave me a roll of toilet. I have a lot of respect for all sizes of horses

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Arleen! Yes it was. If we had been city kids, I’m pretty sure I never would have gotten on a horse again either after that first experience. But we were farm kids thru and thru and riding horses was just part of life on the farm – rough and tough. Many bumps and bruises, quite a few broken bones, luckily none of them mine :), but a lot of good times and fond memories.

  • OOh God what an experience of learning a ride on pony. All pictures are so cute and first time I heard about such ponies. I hope when first pony throw you down , you were not hurt much. The second style was amazing seems second pony was even smarter.
    I feel the lessons that you have mentioned are very important. This is true that when we fall then we must try to stand again. Beside we must pray from our God for help when road is bumpy.

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Andleeb: Yes I did see a few stars when I flew off my Shetland pony – no concussion. 🙂 That pony stayed with that same technique of running into the house with his head to get me off the entire time I had to ride him. He would go for a little ways, but as soon as he determined the ride was over, it was OVER and he’d take off for home and I’d go flying. Had to learn to tuck and roll. lol

  • Jon Jefferson

    I’ve never been on a horse or a pony. Sometimes I wonder if I’ve been deprived.

    • Kristi Morgan

      Well of course I am a bit biased, but I definitely think you’ve been deprived. It’s never too late to start though. Luckily you are a little too grown up for a Shetland pony – although I’m sure it’d find a way to buck you off even if your toes were almost touching the ground on either side as you sat on him. Lol I’d definitely go with something kinder and gentler if I were you. 🙂

  • Horses scare me so a Shetland pony would me more my size as it is the size of horses that scares me most, Shetland ponies are so bloody cute

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Joanne. Shetland ponies are tremendously cute, aren’t they? But that’s where they get you! Don’t fear the size of the horse. I’d be way more afraid of a tiny Shetland pony that a well trained horse any day. 🙂

  • What a wonderful post – from yikes to of course. I think I remember hearing about the meanness of this particular pony. We had a horse for about a year when we were in Turkey and it was an awesome experience. What I like most, is your valuable, and I find true, insights about it being much like lessons from God. Thanks for this one.

    • Kristi Morgan

      Hi Pat, I am so glad you liked my post! When I first told my Southern California raised, college age daughter I was going to share one of my stories on Susan’s blog and it was called Lessons from My Shetland Pony her first response was, “Boy does that sound redneck, Mom.” 🙂 Her second response after reading it was “Only my mom could compare God to a Shetland pony.” lol But in the end, she too, couldn’t disagree she liked the insight and lesson, no matter “country” it may be. Like Susan, I believe in looking back at our childhood and seeing what lessons can be learned from our experiences. Happy Thanksgiving to you Pat!

  • Lucy

    Thanks for the inspiring post! I have a question for Kristi, if it’s no trouble: would you recommend passive negative reinforcement (shouting, harsh sounds) or active (threat of whip, pushing away) for a particularly temperamental and cheeky 26 year old Shetland? This Shetland gets free run of the yard and occasionally bites dogs, horses and people for no other plausible reason than cheekiness! If pushed from the side he will try to buck at you, if stroked he will try to bite – yet he approaches people too close for comfort and always wants to sniff! I have been letting him sniff and only walked away from him and shouted/made harsh sounds if he tried to bite, but I fear I’m being too nice and therefore only encouraging his potentially dangerous behaviour. P.S. His past is not known but I imagine he was not trained very well!